Vibrator Review – Ruby by Vibease

Vibease recently released a line of vibrators themed around gemstones that they refer to as their Jewel Collection, consisting of Ruby, Onyx, and Emerald. Vibease sent us the Ruby so we could put the screws to it in our thorough fashion. As a quick aside about the format I typically don’t use manufacturer images. I find white-box/black-box photography can take out a lot of important details and characteristics from sex toys and particularly in our normal fantasy genre wheel house. We did a review of another Vibease product—their namesake remote control vibrator—in the past and also took our own photos due to how the geometry of the toy was left ambiguous on the product page at the time of writing—it seems to have been rectified since. This time however, the product page pretty accurately reflects the product in a few ways that made reproducing those efforts something I wasn’t going to waste time on. One, the toy is a pale coral pink and most of its features disappear without some contrasting shadows thrown in and they already did that. Two, the toy is small and Vibease already got it from all the angles I felt were important. Three, they actually have two pictures of the thing sitting in a human hand to provide scale. Why am I going on about that? Well, I like to provide credit where it’s due. Also, I think most white-box product photography doesn’t serve this segment well at all and certainly not the consumer and it happens so rarely that I think a sex toy has adequate stock photos that encountering it feels somewhat novel.

When it comes to the physical characteristics of the toy that can’t be communicated through images the finish of the silicone on the Ruby is super satin soft and very pleasing to the touch. It’s probably due to the flexibility of most of the toys features, but it feels even softer than their remote couples’ vibes we reviewed last year. To say this eliminates the ‘grabby’ feel of silicone is somewhat of an understatement, and even if it were identical across all of Vibease’s products I’d feel the need to point it out each and every time.

One thing that doesn’t set my heart a flutter is the USB charger. Granted, this is somewhat of a staple on waterproof and highly water resistant toys—for obvious reasons—but necessity aside you’re going to have to take great care not to lose the charger as you simply can’t just take a commodity charger to it or replace the batteries. I do wonder if it would be feasible to simply make a USB-C or even Mini-B adapter to the pokey thing so the cost of losing these things wouldn’t be so high or to provide a slightly lower cost SKU sans the charger, or even just to make the cost of charger replacement lower. The same could probably be done for the magnetic style chargers. This is more a complaint of industry trends rather than a specific complaint of the Ruby, but I do greatly dislike this charger style. On that note, it is in fact water proof and can be used in the shower. We definitely put it through it’s paces there. Consider this a manufacturer claim confirmed.

A nice thoughtful add-on feature to the Ruby is the ring light at the base of the vibrator. It’s a pretty simple thing, a light that comes on at an intensity reflecting the state of the vibrators motor. It helps identify what the patterns are doing. I appreciate useful practical low cost feature add-ons like this.

The shut down procedure however, needs a lot of work. This seems like an exercise in oversimplification. There is only one button on the entire toy. It controls the power state of the device, but also cycles through the devices functions. It’s also really hard to see and is incorporated into the body pattern flush. That pale coral pink that deletes the ability to see features without contrasting shadows doesn’t just affect cameras, it affects your eyeballs too, and I took me a moment to find the power button even with Emily’s assistance and she had already used the thing once. Adding to that problem is that the shutoff function is achieved by a long press of the power button, so there’s significant delay in powering the toy off. How much that matters to you will be based on your general preferences and situation but with three kids of “I suddenly had a nightmare and need my mommy” age group, there isn’t a toy out there that turns off fast enough and it doesn’t need help taking longer.

The Ruby is pleasantly travel sized for those of you who take that sort of thing into consideration.

The Ruby claims to be a powerful vibrator and for its size we wouldn’t call that claim inaccurate. Use is going to heavily dictate how it feels to you and we’ll go into that in a little more detail further into the review. What I wanted to touch on here though was the concept of power. The motors that provide the vibrations are not complicated devices and the amount of power a vibrator can produce is heavily size and power source bound—this is why large corded vibrators tend to dominate the power scales. To sum this idea up I find the whole ‘power’ thing an example of weasel marketing that some bad actors sadly make a bit necessary. What would even be the point of not making the powerful claim when 2 inch bullet vibes that cost 3 dollars and are powered by hearing aid batteries are going around saying the same thing? What’s more important than raw power, and especially with designs like this, is if the power is adequate to do the job. That’s a whole-hearted yes for the Ruby, and I’m not sure more ‘power’ would even help the design much. For example can you imagine if Satisfyer and Womanizer toys got into a power battle and kept amping that suction up? Bruised clitorises by the end of that. Power is a far more important consideration for other types of vibrator designs, wands for instance.

Speaking of the functional design, the Ruby’s plays a critical role in how you play with it and we’ll be spending some time going over how we exploited it. Referring back to the pictures you can see that the toy has two ‘tongues’ coming off what would usually be the end of the toy. They are spaced apart significantly and vibrations transfer into them causing them to experience a significant amount of flitting about. There aren’t really any tricks to achieving this, just traditional vibration plus some enabling geometry. What that means is you can adjust the power a great deal without adjusting the power at all. The power you feel will vary greatly based on which part of the toy you are currently using. The closer you get to the end of the tongues the lower the power you will experience. The closer you get to the motor the stronger the power. Simple. So that may raise the question of why you’d use the tongues at all if you can just use it like a typical vibrator anyway. The answer is there’s some useful tricks the extended bits of the toy can do. Emily actually found it quite suitable for nipple play. I will reiterate this in case I haven’t made it clear yet, the way Ruby and other fluttering style vibrators justify existing is with the tongues, and if those don’t work into your play style there’s no reason to shell out for them over a more traditional vibrator. So lets go over our experience with them.

Fundamentally, we treat the tips of the toy as a ‘precision’ class vibrating toy for clitoral stimulation, which is good because that’s how they’re marketed. When used this way it seems best as a foreplay aide and a teasing function, not something to take you all the way from 0 to 100—though that’ll vary by person. The marketing even reflects this, which tells me they actually tested this toy internally to make sure it met design goals. That may sound like an obvious and necessary step of development but trust me, there are a lot of toys out there where this doesn’t seem to have been done. Most companies don’t care about that, and that’s easy to forget because we basically just don’t cover companies like that, but they are all over the bargain sections of drop shipping websites, amazon, ebay, and they frequently fill the shelves of local toy shops. Due to the vibrations already being significantly attenuated by the time you get to the tongue tips and due to the limited contact area, we find that vibration transfer to a partner is severely limited when used this way, and that can be a really good thing. At the very least, it matches the foreplay element of the toy. You don’t want to be transferring a lot of vibration to your partner during warm up in my experience—not if you want to go the distance together anyway. It’s also a pleasant geometry for the same—wands can be a bit clumsy in that use case. We find that Ruby functionally suffers from the same broad drawbacks of other precision style toys. Obviously that makes sense but it bears mentioning. Much like the clitoris ‘sucking’ toys it may be necessary to do a significant amount of finding nemo to get the toy into position, and if you are like Emily and your clitoris is somewhere between average to small size it can run away from you right before orgasm and cause precision toys to essentially stop being effective, especially if a lot of movement is happening.

The uses for the motor section of the toy—where the base of the tongues are—is a bit more traditional and intuitive so I won’t spend a whole lot of time on that aside from how it works during a pure solo session. The basic idea of the workflow here seems to be to use the precision/lower power end of the toy to warm up with and to gradually move along the geometry towards the base as you need more power and less tease. That provides a nice stimulation ramp and Emily finds that very useful for edging, and that might be the strongest recommended use case for Ruby in our books. That’s not to pigeon hole the Ruby mind you. We find the design useful for nipple play, teasing, precision, and broad stimulation and that’s a pretty versatile set of tasks in its own right.

Let’s talk about the price for a moment. The normal price for the Ruby is 69.00 bucks even USD. That lands it right in the middle of the pack for the fluttering tip design. There are competing designs from 30 dollars that chop some features and use AA batteries and designs that shoot up to the 140 mark for…reasons. Having reviewed models of neither of those price points I can’t directly compare, but that’s the price range I could find for competing designs. At the time of writing however, there is a 25% discount which compresses the normal difference between Ruby and entry level models. That is to say if you think fluttering tip designs are right for you I would call Ruby a convincing deal. As for our evaluation of the fluttering tip design as a whole that’s just going to be a per-body thing and there’s not really an analog sensation I can think of to match it to for the purposes of an ‘if you like x you’ll probably enjoy this’ type statement. I can say that Emily had no issues taking the Ruby all the way solo a few times so I can say you’ll likely not be outright disappointed in its performance.

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